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January 1996, Volume 46, Issue 1

Original Article

HLA Frequencies in Pakistani Population Groups

Naqi Zafar  ( Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Dow Medical College and Civil Hospital, Karachi. )
Sacedullah Khan  ( Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Dow Medical College and Civil Hospital, Karachi. )
Abdul Qadir  ( Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Dow Medical College and Civil Hospital, Karachi. )
Yawar Raza  ( Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Dow Medical College and Civil Hospital, Karachi. )
Anwar Naqvi  ( Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Dow Medical College and Civil Hospital, Karachi. )
Adib Rizvi  ( Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Dow Medical College and Civil Hospital, Karachi. )

Abstract

HLA Antigen A, B and DR frequencies were determined in 912 subjects who were prospective donors and recipients for renal transplantation. Of the 912, 305 were Sindhi, 248 Punjabi, 315 Urdu and 44 Pushto speaking. HLA Al, A2, All and A19 were common in all these groups. A3 was more frequent in Pushto, A9 (24) in in Pun jabi, AlO (26) in Sindhi and A28 in Urdu-speaking group. HLA B5 (51) and B40 (60) were common in all, while B8 in Sindhi and Punjabi, B35 in Sindhi, Urdu and Pushto and B27 in Punjabi and Urdu speaking individuals . HLA-DR3 and DR2 (15) were common in a!! groups. DR6 (13) in Sindhi, Urdu and Pushto and DR6 (14) in Punjabi, DR5 (11) in Urdu, Punjabi and Pushto speaking subjects. Overall, Pakistani frequencies showed linkage to Caucasians and Orientais. This paper describes differences in frequencies in various population groups within Pakistan which may have relevance in factors where HLA HLA Antigen A, B and DR frequencies were determined in 912 subjects who were prospective donors and recipients for renal transplantation. Of the 912, 305 were Sindhi, 248 Punjabi, 315 Urdu and 44 Pushto speaking. HLA Al, A2, All and A19 were common in all these groups. A3 was more frequent in Pushto, A9 (24) in in Pun jabi, AlO (26) in Sindhi and A28 in Urdu-speaking group. HLA B5 (51) and B40 (60) were common in all, while B8 in Sindhi and Punjabi, B35 in Sindhi, Urdu and Pushto and B27 in Punjabi and Urdu speaking individuals . HLA-DR3 and DR2 (15) were common in a!! groups. DR6 (13) in Sindhi, Urdu and Pushto and DR6 (14) in Punjabi, DR5 (11) in Urdu, Punjabi and Pushto speaking subjects. Overall, Pakistani frequencies showed linkage to Caucasians and Orientais. This paper describes differences in frequencies in various population groups within Pakistan which may have relevance in factors where HLA system plays a crucial role (JPMA 46:12, 1996).

Introduction

The importance of the HLA system is now well recognized as an incompatibility factor in organ transplanta­tion1, immunological recognition and immune response2 and susceptibility to diseases3. Thus, a large number of studies have reported on different populations and ethnic groups to collect basic data on their HLA antigen allele frequencies. Recently two reports have appeared in the literature on Pakistani populations, one from Hannan et al from Rawal­pindi4 and the other from our own laboratory5. We now report HLA allele frequencies in various populations based on provincial and linguistic groups.

Materials and Methods

A total of 912 subjects were tested for HLA A, B and DR antigens. All subjects were prospective recipients and donors for renal transplantation. The HLA antigens were tested by two stage NIH microlymphocytotoxicity assay by eosin dye extrusion. Antisera trays were obtained from the Collabora­tive Transplant Study (CTS) Heidelberg, Germany. HLA A and B were tested on two trays AB 1 and AB2 of 60 antisera each. HLA DR were tested on 60 antisera trays. Purified Tand B cells were used for Class I and Class II antigens by using monoclonal labeled magnetic beads (Dyna Beads). Relative allele frequencies were calculated via the total number of subjects.

Results

A total of 912 subjects were tested. Of these 305 (33.4%) were Sindhis, 248 (263%) Punjabis, 3 15 (34.5%) Urdu­speaking and 44(5%) were Pushto-spcaking. HLA Afrequen­cies are shown in Table I.

HLA Al, A2, All and A19 were common in aligroups. A3 was frequent in Pushto, A9 (24) in Punjabi, AlO (26) in Sindhi and A28 inUrdu-speaking groups. HLA B frequencies are given in Table II.

B5 (5 1) and B40 (60) were common in all groups. B8 Was more in Sindhis and Punjabis, B35 in Sindhi, Urdu and Pushto speaking people, B12 (44) inPunjabi and Urdu speaking individuals; B27 was most frequent in Punjabi and Urdu-speaking. HLA DR frequencies are given in Table Ill.

DR2 (15) and DR3 were common in all groups. DR7 was common inPunjabi and Urdu, DR6 (13) in Sindhi, Urdu and Pitshto, while DR6 (14) in Punjabi and Urdu. DR5 (11) in Urdu, Punjabi and Pushto speaking subjects. A comparison of Pakistani: frequencies with other population groups is given in Table IV.

Our population shows linkage to Caucasians and Orientals. A comparison of common antigens in various Pakistani groups is given in Table V.

Discussion

Earlier studies on our population6,7 have shown linkage to Caucasians. Recent studies show linkage to Orientals4, while our study shows linkage to both Caucasians and Orientals5. The advent of renal transplantation in Pakistan has given an impetus to the study of HLA system. Our present data o.n various ethnic groups, though small in numbers, specially from Pushto-speaking, provides a baseline for further study in terms of HLA and disease association and HLA matching for organ allocation in view of the expected cadaver law on organ transplantation.

References

1. Opel; G. The benefit ofexchanging donor kidneys among transplant centers. N. EngI. J. Med., 1988;318:1289-1292.
2. Klein, 1. Natural history of major histocompatibility complex. New York.,John. Wiley and Sons, 1986,,p. 424ff.
3. Tiwari, J.L. and Terasaki, P.I. HLA and disease associations. Springer-Verlag, New York, Tokyo, Berlin, Heidelberg, Springer. Verlag, 1985, pp. 7.200.
4. Hannan, A., Anwar, M., Ahmed, TA. et al. HLA frequencies in Pakistani population. J. Pak. Med. Assoc., 1990;40:294-29~.
5. Naqi, Z. HLA frequencies in Pakistani population. Transplant, Proc., 1994;26:1853.
6. Singal, DR The distribution of HLA leucocyte antigens in Indians, in histocompatibility testing. Copenhagen, Munksgaond, 1972, p. 179.
7. Harris, R. HLA frequencies in West Pakistanis (Punjabi) in The United Kingdom, in histocompatibility testing. Copenhagen, Munsgaard, 1972, pp. 163.

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